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The Barbarous Years

The Peopling of British North America: The Conflict of Civilizations, 1600-1675

by Bernard Bailyn

eBook

1 of 1 copy available

Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize
A compelling, fresh account of the first great transit of people from Britain, Europe, and Africa to British North America, their involvements with each other, and their struggles with the indigenous peoples of the eastern seaboard.


The immigrants were a mixed multitude. They came from England, the Netherlands, the German and Italian states, France, Africa, Sweden, and Finland, and they moved to the western hemisphere for different reasons, from different social backgrounds and cultures. They represented a spectrum of religious attachments. In the early years, their stories are not mainly of triumph but of confusion, failure, violence, and the loss of civility as they sought to normalize situations and recapture lost worlds. It was a thoroughly brutal encounter—not only between the Europeans and native peoples and between Europeans and Africans, but among Europeans themselves, as they sought to control and prosper in the new configurations of life that were emerging around them.


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Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group

Kindle Book

  • Release date: November 6, 2012

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9780307960825
  • Release date: November 6, 2012

EPUB eBook

  • ISBN: 9780307960825
  • File size: 10979 KB
  • Release date: November 6, 2012


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1 of 1 copy available

Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB eBook

Languages

English

Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize
A compelling, fresh account of the first great transit of people from Britain, Europe, and Africa to British North America, their involvements with each other, and their struggles with the indigenous peoples of the eastern seaboard.


The immigrants were a mixed multitude. They came from England, the Netherlands, the German and Italian states, France, Africa, Sweden, and Finland, and they moved to the western hemisphere for different reasons, from different social backgrounds and cultures. They represented a spectrum of religious attachments. In the early years, their stories are not mainly of triumph but of confusion, failure, violence, and the loss of civility as they sought to normalize situations and recapture lost worlds. It was a thoroughly brutal encounter—not only between the Europeans and native peoples and between Europeans and Africans, but among Europeans themselves, as they sought to control and prosper in the new configurations of life that were emerging around them.


Expand title description text